Friday, April 3, 2009

China Is Trapped In The Dollar

There has been a lot of talk lately about China's desire to diversify out of the dollar, however, unfortunately for them they are trapped. The worst part for China is that this entrapment was self-inflicted as Paul Krugman points out in his recent New York Times article. For more on this, read the following blog post from Mark Thoma.

It's time "to face up to new realities":

China’s Dollar Trap, by Paul Krugman, Commentary, NY Times: ...The big news last week was a speech by Zhou Xiaochuan, the governor of China’s central bank, calling for a new “super-sovereign reserve currency.”

The paranoid wing of the Republican Party promptly warned of a dastardly plot to make America give up the dollar. But Mr. Zhou’s speech was actually an admission of weakness. In effect, he was saying that China had driven itself into a dollar trap, and that it can neither get itself out nor change the policies that put it in into that trap in the first place.

Some background: In the early years of this decade, China began running large trade surpluses and also began attracting substantial inflows of foreign capital. If China had had a floating exchange rate — like, say, Canada — this would have led to a rise in the value of its currency, which, in turn, would have slowed the growth of China’s exports.

But China chose instead to keep the value of the yuan in terms of the dollar more or less fixed. To do this, it had to buy up dollars as they came flooding in. As the years went by, those trade surpluses just kept growing — and so did China’s hoard of foreign assets. ...

Aside from a late, ill-considered plunge into equities (at the very top of the market), the Chinese mainly accumulated very safe assets,... U.S. Treasury bills... T-bills are as safe from default as anything on the planet... But ... any future fall in the dollar would mean a big capital loss for China. Hence Mr. Zhou’s proposal to move to a new reserve currency along the lines of the S.D.R.’s, or special drawing rights, in which the International Monetary Fund keeps its accounts. ...

S.D.R.’s aren’t real money. They’re accounting units whose value is set by a basket of dollars, euros, Japanese yen and British pounds. And there’s nothing to keep China from diversifying its reserves away from the dollar, indeed from holding a reserve basket matching the composition of the S.D.R.’s — nothing, that is, except for the fact that China now owns so many dollars that it can’t sell them off without driving the dollar down and triggering the very capital loss its leaders fear.

So what Mr. Zhou’s proposal actually amounts to is a plea that someone rescue China from the consequences of its own investment mistakes. That’s not going to happen.

And the call for some magical solution to the problem of China’s excess of dollars suggests something else:... China’s leaders haven’t come to grips with the fact that the rules of the game have changed in a fundamental way.

Two years ago,... China could save much more than it invested and dispose of the excess savings in America. That world is gone.

Yet the day after his new-reserve-currency speech, Mr. Zhou gave another speech in which he seemed to assert that China’s extremely high savings rate is immutable, a result of Confucianism, which values “anti-extravagance.” Meanwhile, “it is not the right time” for the United States to save more. In other words, let’s go on as we were.

That’s also not going to happen.

The bottom line is that China hasn’t yet faced up to the wrenching changes that will be needed to deal with this global crisis. The same could, of course, be said of the Japanese, the Europeans — and us.

And that failure to face up to new realities is the main reason that, despite some glimmers of good news — the G-20 summit accomplished more than I thought it would — this crisis probably still has years to run.

This post can also be viewed on economistsview.typepad.com.

Labels: , , , ,

Subscribe to NuWire's free weekly investment newsletter:
  
Your information will not be shared

1 comments:

April 4, 2009 at 9:29 AM Christian said...

I've wondered if they're actually big enough on their own to break free of the US. We'll see. I don't see how they can keep lending to us though...it's an interesting predicament for all.

Post a Comment

Home

© 2013 NuWire Investor and NuWire, Inc. All Rights Reserved.